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Did You Know

Did You Know

'Coffee' returns more than 5 billion results on Google.

We've sought to weave out the questions most asked & settle some of the bubbling areas of debate about the drink we all love.

'Coffee' returns more than 5 billion results on Google.

We've sought to weave out the questions most asked & settle some of the bubbling areas of debate about the drink we all love.

From Plantation to Cup

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GROWING THE PLANT
Coffee is grown in tropical regions known as the Bean Belt or Coffee Belt. Robusta & Arabica are the main types of coffee plants. Robusta is hardier & produces stronger coffee, often used in espresso blends. Arabica coffee is smoother with more aromatic notes.
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HARVESTING
Coffee cherries which contain the coffee beans are harvested once mature. Harvesting methods vary & can be done manually or mechanically. Cherries can be strip-picked (all cherries harvested at once) or selectively-picked (harvested as they ripen).
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PROCESSING
After harvesting, the coffee cherries are pulped, fermented, washed, dried & hulled. These steps remove outer layers of the cherry & prevent mould growing. Finally, the beans are sorted by size, colour & density.
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ROASTING
Roasting impacts the flavour, aroma & colour of coffee. Different roasting temperatures & times will influence the overall taste profile. A longer, darker roast results in bolder, more intense flavours.
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GRINDING
Different brewing methods require different grind sizes. Some methods force water under high pressure through the coffee, others are more gentle. Getting the right grind size for how you brew will transform how it tastes.
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BREWING
Espresso machines use a fine grind & are closest to that café experience at home. Pop a Moka Pot on your stovetop & use a medium-fine grind for a strong coffee. For a smooth cup with great flavour clarity, try a pour over & medium grind. For a coffee with plenty of body, go for a cafetière & coarse grind.

We Love a Dark Roast

Darker roasts give coffee a bolder & more intense flavour. When you combine a darker roast with blending coffees from all over the Bean Belt like we do, you get a wonderfully complex & full-bodied cup of coffee.

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A Bit of Coffee History

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9TH CENTURY
Coffee was born in the highlands of Ethiopia where legend has it a goat herder named Kaldi discovered the energising effects of coffee when his goats began nibbling on the plants.
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15TH CENTURY
The news about coffee spread through trade routes to the Arabian Peninsula. By the 15th Century, coffeehouses had sprung up in the Middle East & it became fashionable to gather there to chat & drink.
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17TH CENTURY
A little later, European cities began to adopt café culture. In places like London,Paris & Vienna, discussions & debates amongst intellectuals were had over a stimulating cup of coffee.
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19TH CENTURY
For a long time, coffee was prepared using simple infusion (like a tea bag), but in the 19th Century, Angelo Moriondo filed the world’s first patent for an espresso machine, allowing for a concentrated & quick extraction.
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20TH CENTURY
A pilgrimage to find the best espresso in Italy in 1975 led Nestlé worker Eric Favre to create Nespresso. He watched a barista in Rome work his magic & tried to recreate the experience at home. After several trials, the first Nespresso machine was launched in 1986.
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21ST CENTURY
Today, coffee is one of the most popular drinks worldwide. There are thousands of speciality coffee brands, shops & ways to make coffee at home, including a whole host of coffee serves & recipes.

We Were a Pod Pioneer

We were one of the first to make Nespresso® compatible pods way back in 2011. Getting café-style coffee at home was nigh-on-impossible at the time. Surely, someone would bring delicious coffee in pods to supermarkets? Turns out that someone was us.

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Top 10 Facts About Coffee

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WHY IS COFFEE BROWN?
This is all down to the roast. Before coffee is roasted, it is green. But in the fiery roasting chamber, the heat causes a chemical reaction that produces brown compounds called melanoids.
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WHAT IS CREMA?
Crema comes from the Italian word 'cream' & consists of microbubbles of CO₂ that are made as hot water hits coffee under high pressure. The microbubbles attach to the natural oils& fats you find in coffee.
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COLD BREW VS. ICED COFFEE
Cold brew is made by immersing coarsely ground coffee in cold or room temperature water for an extended period, resulting in a smoother & sweeter flavour. Iced coffee is brewed hot & then cooled down by being poured over ice.
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CAFFEINE IN DECAF
Decaffeinated coffee does contain some caffeine, but a very small amount. A typical cup of decaf coffee may contain around 2 to 5 milligrams of caffeine, compared to the 80 - 100 milligrams in a regular cup.
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CALORIES IN COFFEE
Black coffee has a negligible amount of calories, typically only around 2 calories per cup. However, by adding milk, sugar or syrups, this will increase the calorie count.
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IS COFFEE VEGAN?
Regular roasted coffee is vegan. However, make sure to check the ingredients if you or anyone else is adding anything to your coffee, like milk or flavourings.
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BENEFITS OF CAFFEINE
According to Harvard University, caffeine found in coffee may help you stay alert, support your concentration & give you an energy boost.
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LIGHT VS DARK ROAST
Longer roasts produce darker, richer coffee that is less acidic. With shorter roasts, you'll get lighter coffee & are likely to perceive more fruity notes & some mild acidity.
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CAFFEINE IN COFFEE
It will vary from cup to cup, but an average cup of coffee contains about 80 - 100 milligrams of caffeine.
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COFFEE TYPES
There are 4 types: Arabica, Robusta, Liberia & Excelsa. The first two make up the majority of the world's coffee. Robusta is a hardy plant & produces coffee with a higher caffeine content & more body, whilst Arabica is know for its sweet profile.